S1 E7 – Designing For The Physically Challenged With Mark Boucher

This week on the Student Lounge, Trish interviews the incredible and inspiring Mark Boucher. Mark’s CV is impressive – he is the former CEO of a multi-billion dollar corporation; a successful former politician and advocate for the physically challenged; SUNY speaker, college professor, MBA coach, and Director of the Stand Up & Play Foundation, as well as a father of four children and husband of 38 years.

Mark is a fearless go-getter who believes in the power of choice. This ethos had guided him throughout his life which has been fraught with debilitating illnesses. A survivor of a brain aneurysm and three bouts with cancer, a stroke victim with a heart condition, Mark contracted multiple sclerosis when he was 30 years old.

Mark’s life has nevertheless been rich and full of meaning and accomplishment.

As a champion for the physically challenged, Mark discusses how designers and architects can positively impact the world around them by thinking differently during the design process. The physically challenged and those close to them represent a huge dollar amount market share and Mark believes that they yet to be properly serviced or represented in the design process. Trish and Mark discuss how to rectify this, and the potential rewards for forward-thinking designers who can think – and design – differently.

For more info on Mark Boucher, you can visit him on his Facebook page, his Twitter page or check out the Stand Up & Play Foundation.

About the Author
Originally from Dallas, Texas, Lauren moved to Denver three years ago and is loving every bit. Though she came to Colorado to study communications, marketing, and journalism, she’s got a love for all things art, design and media related. Lauren’s gig at The Chaise Lounge includes writing, copy editing and creating social media content. When not in classes at the University of Denver or writing about the business of interior design, you can find her with a camera or paintbrush in her hand, hiking in the Rocky Mountains, or on the ski slopes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

X